Radiometric dating uses the decay rates of

The 4-part dialog (essay review, response, and replies) is in Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith, the peer-reviewed journal of ASA.To supplement the multi-topic general articles above, the pages below focus on specific topics, Helium Diffusion Radiocarbon Decay Polonium Halos Excessive Heat Conferences Helium Diffusion in Zircons • To supplement an introductory paragraph and a brief semi-technical overview in the papers above (Assessing the Rate Project and a response from RATE and replies...), Randy Isaac wrote Helium Diffusion and Retention in Zircons to describe a Standard Model (used by scientists to gather clues about the thermal history of a zircon crystal) and two models proposed by RATE: a New Creation Model (used by RATE) and Uniformitarian Model (used by nobody, since ) • Helium Diffusion in Zircon: Flaws in a Young-Earth Argument, Part 1 and Part 2 by Gary Loechelt, and his associated technical paper Fenton Hill Revisited: The Retention of Helium in Zircons and the Case for Accelerated Nuclear Decay.by Kirk Bertsche, is an expansion of his reply in PSCF, which you can read above in Polonium Halos in Granites • Polonium Halos and Myrmekite in Pegmatite & Granite by Lorence Collins, who also has a links-page (halos are examined in 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 14) Excessive Heat — a Catastrophic Problem for a Catastrophic Flood What is the problem?

No known thermodynamic process could account for the required rate of heat removal nor is there any known way to protect organisms from radiation damage. Yet they are so confident that these problems will be resolved that they encourage a message that the reliability of [their young-earth interpretation of] the Bible has been confirmed." Here are two evaluations of proposed young-earth solutions for the problem of overheating: • Flaws in a Young-Earth Cooling Mechanism by Glenn Morton & George Murphy • Nonexistence of Humphreys’ “Volume Cooling” for Terrestrial Heat Disposal by Cosmic Expansion by J.

Therefore RATE must propose that almost all of this decay occurred during the one-year flood, because for some unknown reason the decay rate for some atoms (but not others) was extremely high (but only for a year, not before or after).

This amount of decay would produce an immense amount of heat quickly, in less than a year.

These systems have unstable nuclei that emit various particles and radiation until they stabilize.

It was finally established that these seasonal fluctuations corresponded to the distance between the earth and the sun.

Search for radiometric dating uses the decay rates of:

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These bubbles collapse to produce shock waves—very powerful on tiny scales—that have been known to rapidly destroy boat propellers and pump parts, catastrophically erode water tunnels, and create light sparks.

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