Formula for validating dea number

123 Validation Results Result from is Possible Number() true Result from is Valid Number() true Formatting Results E164 format 61299999999 Original format 61 2 9999 9999 National format (02) 9999 9999 International format 61 2 9999 9999 Out-of-country format from US 011 61 2 9999 9999 Out-of-country format from CH 00 61 2 9999 9999 Unless you are certain that you are always going to be accepting numbers from one locale, and they are always going to be in one format, I would heavily suggest not writing your own code for this, and using libphonenumber for validating and displaying phone numbers.

I would also consider any of the following as valid entries on a web site: Validation Results Result from is Possible Number() true Result from is Valid Number() true Formatting Results: E164 format 12345678901 Original format (234) 567-8901 ext. 123 Out-of-country format from CH 00 1 234-567-8901 ext.

I came up with this: Here's a perl script to test it. It should be compatible with international numbers and localization formats.

Since you'd need a regex anyway, you might as well have the regex do all the work. I answered this question on another SO question before deciding to also include my answer as an answer on this thread, because no one was addressing how to require/not require items, just handing out regexs: Regex working wrong, matching unexpected things From my post on that site, I've created a quick guide to assist anyone with making their own regex for their own desired phone number format, which I will caveat (like I did on the other site) that if you are too restrictive, you may not get the desired results, and there is no "one size fits all" solution to accepting all possible phone numbers in the world - only what you decide to accept as your format of choice. Note that it doesn't have any special rules for how many digits, or what numbers are valid in those digits, it just verifies that only digits, parenthesis, dashes, plus, space, pound, asterisk, period, comma, or the letters are present.

he National Provider Identifier (NPI) check digit is calculated using the ISO standard Luhn algorithm, a modulus 10 algorithm.

The Luhn algorithm was designed as a simple method to help guard against accidental keying errors.

Can someone explain me meaning of this code in luhn algorithm?

:\(\s*([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9])\s*\)|([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9]))\s*(? When you match,

:\(\s*([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9])\s*\)|([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9]))\s*(? When you match, $1 contains the area code, $2 and $3 contain the phone number, and $5 contains the extension. Do you foresee any need to allow square, curly, or angled brackets for some regions? If you want to maintain per digit rules (such as in US Area Codes and Prefixes (exchange codes) must fall in the range of 200-999) well, good luck to you.

You probably know that if you’re looking for a way to generate them though.

The first digit has to be one or two and the last digit is actually a check digit of the rest of the digits plus a prefix that’s applied to the NPI to make a different identification number.

A few examples are: Marijuana, Heroin and MDMA (Extasy). A few examples are: Oxycodone, Codeine and Ritalin. Moderate abuse potential exists, but less than Sch II. Schedule IV - Abuse potential exists, but less than Sch III. Schedule V - Lowest abuse potential of the DEA Sch. Example: Cough medicine w/codeine or anti-diarrheals. - must be used whenever Sch I or II drugs are bought, sold or transferred between pharmacies or qualified distributors.

The forms are only available through the DEA and errors are not acceptable on the form.

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:\(\s*([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9])\s*\)|([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9]))\s*(? When you match, $1 contains the area code, $2 and $3 contain the phone number, and $5 contains the extension. Do you foresee any need to allow square, curly, or angled brackets for some regions? If you want to maintain per digit rules (such as in US Area Codes and Prefixes (exchange codes) must fall in the range of 200-999) well, good luck to you.You probably know that if you’re looking for a way to generate them though.The first digit has to be one or two and the last digit is actually a check digit of the rest of the digits plus a prefix that’s applied to the NPI to make a different identification number.A few examples are: Marijuana, Heroin and MDMA (Extasy). A few examples are: Oxycodone, Codeine and Ritalin. Moderate abuse potential exists, but less than Sch II. Schedule IV - Abuse potential exists, but less than Sch III. Schedule V - Lowest abuse potential of the DEA Sch. Example: Cough medicine w/codeine or anti-diarrheals. - must be used whenever Sch I or II drugs are bought, sold or transferred between pharmacies or qualified distributors.The forms are only available through the DEA and errors are not acceptable on the form.

contains the area code, and contain the phone number, and contains the extension. Do you foresee any need to allow square, curly, or angled brackets for some regions? If you want to maintain per digit rules (such as in US Area Codes and Prefixes (exchange codes) must fall in the range of 200-999) well, good luck to you.

You probably know that if you’re looking for a way to generate them though.

The first digit has to be one or two and the last digit is actually a check digit of the rest of the digits plus a prefix that’s applied to the NPI to make a different identification number.

A few examples are: Marijuana, Heroin and MDMA (Extasy). A few examples are: Oxycodone, Codeine and Ritalin. Moderate abuse potential exists, but less than Sch II. Schedule IV - Abuse potential exists, but less than Sch III. Schedule V - Lowest abuse potential of the DEA Sch. Example: Cough medicine w/codeine or anti-diarrheals. - must be used whenever Sch I or II drugs are bought, sold or transferred between pharmacies or qualified distributors.

The forms are only available through the DEA and errors are not acceptable on the form.

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